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2018 Country Thunder Wisconsin - Saturday

Saturday

Jul 21, 2018 – All Day

2305 Lance Drive
Twin Lakes, WI 53181 Map

  • Country Thunder
  • Tyler Farr
  • Mark Chesnutt
  • Toby Keith
  • Lindsay Ell

More Info

Tyler Farr: Born and raised in the small town of Garden City, Missouri, Tyler grew up hunting and fishing, playing football and baseball, and of course, singing. At the age of 16 he had the opportunity of going on the road with country music legend, George Jones. That was all it took for him to realize that's what he wanted to do. With the help of a friend and hunting buddy, Rhett Akins, Tyler began to move forward in the industry. For the past year Tyler has been writing for Sony BMG's publishing company "Monument" and working with Jim Catino. He continues to write music on a weekly basis and get in his deer stand when he can find the time. For the following year Tyler will be on the road opening and playing for Colt Ford. Look for his upcoming songs on I-Tunes and playing around a hometown near you!--------- " A big thanks goes to Colt Ford for giving me this great opportunity, my fans and everyone supporting me. Without you it would be much harder. Another thanks goes to God for believing in me when no one else did and standing by my side both day and night through thick and thin. I am grateful for everything You have given me. And lastly, I want to thank my family for loving and supporting me all these years. Thank you and God Bless." -------Tyler Farr-------

Mark Chesnutt: Mark Chesnutt is one of Countrys true musical treasures. Critics have hailed him as a classic Country singer of the first order and some of Country musics most elite entertainers from George Jones to George Strait echo this sentiment. Mark Chesnutts stature is easily gauged; he has 14 No. 1 hits, 23 top ten singles, four platinum albums and five gold records. Country music critics and fans alike need look no further when it comes to Country music basics. If you ask Mark Chesnutt hell tell you, Its the music that has kept me around this long. In a world that sometimes confuses style with substance, Mark Chesnutt possesses both. Remaining true to himself as a traditional country artist while still keeping up with the ever-changing country landscape, Mark has a knack for picking great songs; delivering them with his world-class vocals; and with real heart-felt emotion. Mark has set the bar for his generationnot just for his being a consistent hit maker, but because of his love of genuine country music. Mark Chesnutts personal integrity as well as his principal to record a genuine country song has made him a fixture on radio and in the honky tonks. Chesnutt got his start in the honky-tonks of Beaumont, Texas, learning from his father, Bob Chesnutt, a singer, record collector, and major fan of classic country music. Playing along side his dad, one set at a time, Mark embraced his fathers influence and began making a name for himself. Mark sang covers by Lefty, Merle, George, and Waylon to develop his unmatched crowd-pleasing rapport and his authentic country style. Bob Chesnutt often traveled to Nashville to record and to broaden his exposure. He began taking Mark along to record when he was just 17. After nearly a decade of recording on regional labels, word got out about this young country vocalist. Music Row executives came to hear Mark on his own Texas turf and recognized the depth of Mark Chesnutts raw talent. In 1989, he was signed to MCA Nashville and his list of accolades tells the rest of his story. With the release of his first single, Too Cold At Home, Mark established himself as one of countrys most authentic and talented vocalists. He won the CMA Horizon Award getting the attention of country legend George Jones who stated This boy from Beaumont, Texas is the real deal. That recognition and initial success opened the door to give Mark the chance to do what he enjoyed mostsing country music for country fans but this time, on a national level. The first couple years it was non-stop. Mark says. I can remember one time during a tour, I didnt see home for ten months, with exception of a day or a day-and-a-half, then, it was right back out again. Marks dedication paid off. He developed a fan base that is true blue which in turn helped his records climb the charts one right after the other; making him one of Billboards ten most-played radio artists of the 90s. Marks singles were some the decades most memorable; from the fun tempo Bubba Shot The Jukebox to emotional ballad Ill Think Of Something. Mark is easily identified for his string of hits including Brother Jukebox, Blame It On Texas, Old Flames Have New Names, Old Country, It Sure Is Monday, Almost Goodbye, I Just Wanted You To Know, Going Through The Big D, Its A Little Too Late, Gonna Get A Life, and one of his biggest, I Dont Want To Miss A Thing which held its position at the top of the charts for four consecutive weeks. All the recorded highlights he has emassed take a back seat, however, to his first love. Mark Chesnutt lives for the stage. I just make records because I want people to come see my show, he says with a grin. Just listening to music is great, he says, but Ive got to be out there on stage making it. Fans who have seen him perform agree. Known as one of the industrys hardest-working concert performers, maintaining a hefty tour schedule and steady presence in front of his fans, Marks dedication to deliver live music is unsurpassed. Mark has been on the road since 1990. His last tour Rockin Roadhouse Tour with friends Tracy Lawrence and Joe Diffie wrapped last summer. This year, you will find Mark doing what he was born to do, touring and playing the clubs and honky tonks across our great nation. Clubs and honk tonks are home for me; its comfortable and Im always with friends, says Chesnutt. His tour theme is SavinThe Honky Tonk and if Mark Chesnutt is on the stage, then we can be assured that the Honky Tonk is alive and well, no matter what part of the country Mark Chesnutt is playing in. Mark Chesnutt gave honky-tonk music back its soul, noted music critic Robert K. Oermann. When he appeared on an arid musical landscape back in 1990, I dubbed him the hillbilly messiah. Oermann states. I still feel that way today and Ill feel that way decades from now. Married since 1992, Mark and Tracie Chesnutt are the loving parents of three boys, Waylon, Casey, and Cameron. <

Toby Keith: Toby Keith was born with the name Toby Keith Covel on July 8, 1961, in Clinton, Okla. The family moved to Oklahoma City when Keith was young, and it was there he became interested in the musicians who worked in his grandmother's supper club. He got his first guitar at age 8, but it would be years before Keith would pursue music as a career. At 6-feet-4 inches, Keith worked in the oil industry and played defensive end with the Oklahoma City Drillers United States Football League (USFL) team.

In 1984, Keith turned to music full time, playing the honky-tonk circuit in Oklahoma and Texas with the band Easy Money. A demo tape made the rounds in Nashville, but there were no takers. After catching a show in Oklahoma, Mercury Records President Harold Shedd signed him to Mercury Records. His 1993 debut single, "Should've Been a Cowboy," went to No. 1 on the Billboard country singles chart, and his self-titled debut album was certified platinum.

When Shedd left Mercury for Polydor Records, Keith went with him. He released a second album, Boomtown, in 1994. The gold-selling collection produced the No. 1 hit "Who's That Man" and the Top 5 hit "You Ain't Much Fun." The platinum-selling Blue Moon followed in 1996, featuring introspective tunes like "Does That Blue Moon Ever Shine on You" and "Me Too."

When Polydor closed its Nashville operation, Toby Keith returned to Mercury Nashville, releasing Dream Walkin' in 1997. The bittersweet ballad, "When We Were in Love," went to No. 2, as did a cover version of rocker Sting's divorce ode "I'm So Happy I Can't Stop Crying." The duet earned the unlikely pair a Grammy nomination, and Sting joined Keith for a performance on the 1997 CMA Awards telecast. Keith's Greatest Hits, Volume I followed in 1998, although its lead single, "Getcha Some," failed to crack the Top 10. (It has since sold more than 2 million copies.)

Unable to see eye to eye with Mercury, Keith moved to the fledgling DreamWorks Nashville label in 1999. There he worked with label head and producer James Stroud on the studio album How Do You Like Me Now?! The lead single, "When Love Fades," was a modest hit, but the title cut was a five-week No. 1 hit. Another single, "You Shouldn't Kiss Me Like This," also went to the top spot on the singles chart for three weeks.

The double-platinum success of How Do You Like Me Now?! also earned Toby Keith some long-awaited award nominations. Keith won two Academy of Country Music awards in 2000, for male vocalist and album. In 2001, he won his first CMA award, for male vocalist. His 2001 album, Pull My Chain, produced three No. 1 hits, "I'm Just Talkin' About Tonight," "I Wanna Talk About Me" and "My List." (The latter two spent five weeks each at No. 1.) He was also nominated for six Academy of Country Music awards in 2001, though he didn't win any.

On March 24, 2001, Toby Keith's father, H.K. Covel, was killed in a traffic accident in Oklahoma. Covel's truck was sideswiped by another vehicle, which caused his truck to swerve into another lane, where it collided with a charter bus. Within six months, the events of 9/11 prompted Keith to write "Courtesy of the Red, White and Blue (The Angry American)," a song about his father's patriotism that pulled no punches. As the lead single from the 2002 album Unleashed, the song peaked at No. 1 over the Independence Day weekend.

Lindsay Ell: "My dad will tell you that when I was little, the car radio had to be on the country station," Lindsay Ell explains. "If my older brother touched the dial, I would beg him to turn it back. It got to the point that if they were listening to something else, all I had to do was get in the car and they'd automatically flip over to country."

Coming from a family with deep musical roots, the Stoney Creek Records’ artist started playing piano and guitar at a very early age. "I learned how to play guitar traveling to country-bluegrass camps with my dad, and knew right from the beginning of my strong passion for country music."

The 25-year-old Calgary native was discovered at 13 by BTO and The Guess Who's Randy Bachman ("American Woman," "Takin' Care Of Business"). "Randy learned guitar from master jazz guitarist Lenny Breau, so I dove head-first into this world of blues, jazz and rock guitar – learning all these different solos, switching radio stations and trying to get an idea of where all those techniques come from. I was listening to Hendrix, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Clapton, Derek Trucks and all those incredible guitar players.”

Lindsay’s passion and study has served her well, leading to several unique opportunities, including an opening slot with blues icon Buddy Guy; however, her first songwriting trip to Nashville was the catalyst that brought her early affinity for country full-circle. "When I got here, it was like I was home," she says. "I didn't need to put on a facade of who I was or wasn't. And I finally fell back into my roots. Coming to Nashville brought me to who I am and who I'm meant to be."

In October 2013, Lindsay embarked upon one of her most exciting opportunities to-date: an opening slot on The Band Perry’s We Are Pioneers World Tour encompassing 50 dates throughout Europe and North America which ran through March 2014.

Because it is rare, she knows her six-string prowess is not the only focal point, but an accent to her vision as an artist. "There aren't a lot of girls who play electric lead guitar, and it can be a defining thing," she says. First and foremost, I want people to hear me and understand my voice as a country music recording artist. When they come see me, I'd love it if they were impressed at my guitar and piano playing. But by that point, hopefully they understand the artist behind it all has a lot of different sides to her music."

To get to that point, she knows radio will be key – and she can't wait. “Going out on a radio tour and having the chance to share my music and show people how ready I am continues to be one of the most exciting steps I've made yet."

Having spent a decade learning about the music industry from the front of a stage, Lindsay Ell is more than ready for that step – however big or small. "Playing live, honing my craft and developing as performer before taking my first serious try at being a recording artist and getting radio airplay gives me a foundation a lot of artists just don't get. I've had the cords fail, the monitors shut down and mics die. I've seen all kinds of crowds ... and no crowd at all. I feel ready as a singer and a musician. I have confidence as a performer. I've been writing for years and, since moving to Nashville, have found how best to communicate who I am. I'm comfortable in a conference room with six people or onstage opening for Keith Urban in front of thousands. It's really not that different. Both are exciting and a little humbling. Either way, I'm ready to go."

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